Kids these days are always brimming with excitement and have so many questions about almost anything and everything. The moment you step into your house after a long day at work, they’d greet you with the burning questions they have about something they have learned or experienced throughout their day. 

Their questions could range from “What is that?”, “Why is that happening?” to “How does that work?” Well, we’ve made things easier for you with our specially curated picks of STEM shows that we believe kids would absolutely love.

STEM education focuses on educating students in 4 specific disciplines – Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. The integration of these 4 disciplines enables children to learn more than just science and mathematical concepts – children are also able to develop a variety of skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, creativity and many more!

You can now do your own chores or take a short break while enabling your children to learn topics ranging from outer space to math and myth busting – all with these awesome shows! Check them out below! 


Ages 4-6

These shows are great for curious minds as they help stimulate creative thinking and imagination and prepare your kids for school!

1. Blaze and The Monster Machines (STEM)

Rating:  ✭✭✭✩✩ (Common Sense Media) 

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Blaze and the Monster Machines

This animated series revolves around a monster truck and human driver duo, Blaze and AJ, as they have adventures in their city and learn about various STEM concepts like buoyancy and trajectory which help them along the way. Take note mamas – with delightful visuals and captivating tunes, this show is sure to pique your child’s curiosity in learning STEM!

You can watch their episodes and clips for free on their official YouTube channel or on Nick Jr’s website

2. Ask the StoryBots (Science, Math) 

Rating:  ✭✭✭✭✭ (Common Sense Media) 

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: StoryBots

Your child can easily learn scientific concepts in a fun-filled way with the StoryBots! The colourful StoryBots live in computer parts and they help kids find answers to their ‘big questions’. Come and join their exciting adventures as they explore questions relating to Science, Math, Geography and more – with the use of vibrant animation and songs!

StoryBots is available on Netflix and you can view their episodes and clips on their playlist on Netflix Jr’s YouTube account. 

3. Helpsters (Technology, Engineering) 

Rating:  ✭✭✭✭✩ (Common Sense Media) 

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Helpsters

This educational Sesame Workshop series is about a crew of puppet monsters, led by Cody, whose business is solving problems big and small by using the concepts of coding. The Helpsters teach critical thinking and pre-coding concepts so that children learn how to address challenges of any size and simplify them in order to find solutions. 

Your child will be able to catch teamwork in action and also gain important lessons in self-confidence and effective communication!  

The series can be watched on Apple TV+ or you can view clips of their ‘Helpsters Help You’ on their YouTube playlist

4. Earth to Luna! (Science)

Rating:  ✭✭✭✭✭ (Common Sense Media) 

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Earth to Luna

The series features Luna, whose passion for science prompts her exploration of the world with energy and enthusiasm. Together with her little brother Jupiter and pet ferret Clyde, Luna pursues answers to her questions about what things are, and why and how scientific actions take place. Children are sure to bob their heads to the captivating songs in the show and have fun joining in her explorations! 

Watch Luna get excited about Science on the official YouTube channel

5. Numberblocks (Math) 

Rating:  ✭✭✭✭✩ (IMDb) 

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Number Blocks

Numberblocks follows the adventures of cute block characters in Numberland, with the number of blocks determining the numeral they stand for. The characters can even transform into other numbers – for example, the characters 3 and 2 can combine to create the character 5! 

The show helps children learn numeracy skills and ensures that they get a good exposure to early mathematical concepts. That’s right mamas, you can truly count on this show to teach your children simple maths!

You can view their episodes and watch live streamings on Numberblocks’ YouTube channel


Ages 7 and above

These shows are great to reinforce what has been learnt in school and would definitely deepen your child’s interest to learn more about STEM-related concepts!

6. Mythbusters Jr. (Technology, Engineering) 

Rating: ✭✭✭✭✩ (Common Sense Media)

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Mythbusters Jr

A spin-off of the popular TV show Mythbusters, Mythbusters Jr. hosts young talented kids, who bound together to tackle myths using chemistry, physics and popular culture know-how. The show will definitely entertain the young ones with its small-scale experiments that they can do in their kitchen! 

You can view clips of the series on their playlist here or watch it on Amazon Prime Video

7. Odd Squad (Math) 

Rating: ✭✭✭✭✩ (Common Sense Media)

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Odd Squad

In this series, the Odd Squad is an organisation entirely run by children who use their math skills to solve the problems posed in every episode. Now in its third season in 2020, they travel around the world to solve mysteries with their math skills. Children can join in on the fun and learn to solve problems using addition and subtraction, as well as the importance of communication and perseverance! 

You can watch the first 2 seasons of Odd Squad on Netflix.

8. Our Planet (Science) 

Rating: ✭✭✭✭✩ (Common Sense Media)

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Our Planet

Narrated by the renowned David Attenborough, Our Planet is a beautiful docuseries that can be watched by the entire family to learn about the amazing species of wildlife and their survival methods. Children will also be able to learn about topics like climate change and its effects on the environment. 

Though the series is a smart pick for family viewing, parents should be advised that the show contains scenes like predators’ hunting prey. 

You can watch Our Planet on Netflix!

9. Annedroids (Technology, Engineering) 

Rating: ✭✭✭✭✩ (Common Sense Media)

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Annedroids

The show features eleven-year old genius and kid scientist Anne, who loves to solve problems using her expertise in engineering and computer programming. Throughout the series, she happily shares her knowledge with her friends, who join her in exploring the possibilities of science and solving scientific problems with real-life solutions. 

The show incorporates many scientific concepts in each episode, and is sure to inspire children’s interest in the STEM subjects! 

You can watch all four seasons of Annedroids on Amazon Prime Video.

10. Xploration Outer Space (Science) 

Rating:  ✭✭✭✭✭ (Common Sense Media)

Image for Top 10 STEM Shows Blogpost: Xploration Outer Space

Xploration Outer Space exposes kids to STEM concepts as they relate to space discovery. The show encourages children’s curiosity about related subjects as it tackles a range of questions from the fun “How do astronauts go to the bathroom in space suits?” to the philosophical “Could there be life on other planets?”.

The topics that are touched on will make parents want to tune in as well, making this a smart choice for curious families! 

All five seasons of Xploration Outer Space are available on Amazon Prime Video

Due to the rise of the digital economy [1], the demand for tech jobs has increased tremendously. Among those in demand are programmers – but what exactly are the starting salaries of programmers, and how do they compare to those of other professions? 

If you’re interested in pursuing programming in the exciting field of technology and wondering how it would fare for you, you’re in luck! We’ve done the research and here’s all you need to know about the starting salaries of programmers in Singapore (based on recent years). 

We’ve also thrown in a few career tips for you budding programmers, so keep reading to find out!


In recent years, companies have been restructuring efforts in an increasingly digitalised economy. This has resulted in workers with tech skills being the most in demand [2] – particularly workers with the knowledge of programming languages, data science, AI and machine learning expertise. 

The latest graduate employment survey released by the Ministry of Education (MOE) [3] – showed that students in the information and digital technologies sector posted one of the highest rates for full-time jobs and median gross monthly salaries in 2019.

Those in courses such as computer science, information security and software engineering cinched one of the highest median gross monthly pays of $4,400, with Engineering and Health Sciences following closely behind with the median gross monthly salaries of $3,750 and $3,500 respectively. 

The figures reflect the high demand for IT savvy graduates as companies hope to use technology as a competitive edge [4] by digitalising their processes. 


Distinguished billionaires Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg started coding at the tender ages of 13 and 10 respectively – so never think that you’re too young to start! MOE schools have even rolled out a compulsory 10-hour coding enrichment program for all upper primary students with effect from this year but in today’s day and age, we all know that it is still not enough. 

Today’s technology has brought us far – classes can even be conducted online! So how do you know if your kid has the chops for programming? Here are some tips (Budding Teen Coders – this is for YOU!) if you are planning to get started or have already gotten into the thick of coding:

5 tips for budding programmers:

1. Build a strong foundation in logical thinking

You learn to walk before you run, so learn to master the basics first! With a strong foundation, mistakes such as writing more code than necessary or finding code solutions that are not optimal can be avoided. Focus on mastering logic and your computational thinking concepts to build a solid foundation. Python’s a good one to start off with. After that, it’s just a matter of getting used to the syntax of the different programming languages – Building a 3D Game? Designing your own Stock Rating Algorithm? Building your own Web App? The sky’s the limit!

Students in our S101 Python classes.

2. Work hard, work smart

The more practice you have under your belt, the better. Participate in competitions, get involved with different projects, or even volunteer for a local non-profit organization to write software or teach coding to kids. Be prepared to be amazed with what you will learn. You’ll not only gain exposure, but also get to build soft skills and gain a sense of accomplishment.

The bright participants of our Young Coders’ Global Hackathon (YCGH) Finals!

3. Never Give Up!

There will be times where you’ll feel frustrated when trying to solve a problem in your code – and that’s totally normal! The key thing is to never shut off when you experience such setbacks. Error messages in your code are not messages that you’re bad at coding, it’s telling you the code just isn’t working in the way that you thought it would. It’s fine – chances are, you’re closer to finding a solution than you were before. 

Students learning about Program Errors in our Python classes held via Zoom.

4. Optimise code efficiency – Be a perfectionist

Everytime you learn something new, work on your efficiency. Don’t approach your code the same way with the newfound knowledge that you gain – use shortcuts and make yourself a cheat sheet so as to save time and energy. It’s also really important to take breaks every once in a while so that you’re constantly refreshed to do your assignments! 

At Coding Lab, we enforce a 5 minute eye break for every hour of coding that our students get to safeguard their eye health and to also inculcate good habits from young. It also helps to keep our students energised during our lessons! 

Image showing IB Computer Science/O-Level and A-Level Computing tuition
Students focused on their work in class.

5. What can I do better?

Never be satisfied with what you have done. Always ask yourself: “What can be done better?” – There is always something that can be improved. Continuous improvement is a key trademark of a good programmer. 

Bought the expansion pack for League of Legends yet? Who doesn’t love the refreshed look of your phone or your laptop after installing an upgrade for iOs, Android or Windows? These updates are important and beneficial in strengthening your cyber security through processes such as the removal of bugs and outdated features as well as the addition of feature enhancements to your devices. 

“Good specifications will always improve programmer productivity far better than any programming tool or technique.” – Milt Bryce 

Put out questions, search for solutions and learn from the Internet. Code can always be shortened. Code can always be more optimised. And the beauty is in the final product and the work that you have done with your two hands at the keyboard, day and night.

And of course, our reliable tutors at Coding Lab are always dedicated to helping students learn coding in the best possible way – we infuse our students with enthusiasm and help to create the best learning environment for you to comfortably learn in. Make sure to check out our classes here

Students waving hello as they join our online classes!

With the knowledge of starting salaries of programmers and these awesome career tips, we hope that these would motivate you in learning more and increase your passion for coding! After all, it’s our job to nurture future leaders in technology. 

With effect from 2 June, Primary and Secondary students who are in graduating cohorts will attend school daily while other cohorts will rotate weekly between Home-Based Learning and returning to school for lessons. 

With the circuit breaker stay-home measures for the past 1.5 months, your child will have learned to navigate 8 different websites, key in the zoom password effortlessly, and type his/her name confidently for all the HBL and online classes they attended! Indeed your newly minted digital native will still be putting these skills to good use as he/she shuttles between school and the demands of HBL. Here are some specially curated tips that we hope will aid you in making your child’s digital journey the best that it can be. 

Check them out below! 


1. Ensure good digital security habits

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO), children aged 7 to 12 can have close to 2 hours of recreational screen time daily. With their daily Home-Based Learning demands, your child will definitely be logging in and out of multiple websites! Do reinforce the importance of digital security with him/her.

Enhance your digital security through simple cybersecurity steps such as regularly changing passwords, enabling two-factor authentication (it’s as simple as registering a phone number or installing an app) and keeping your software up to date.

Don’t forget to encourage your children to inform you if they come across anything suspicious online!


2. Differentiate between Good and Bad screen time

Parents must learn to differentiate between Good and Bad screen time so as to maximise their children’s learning and development. 

Good screen time refers to children producing content – which can be in the forms of working on their projects, schoolwork or even coding on Scratch! Bad screen time refers to children consuming content – like watching videos on YouTube and playing games that do not contribute to their development. 

As Michel Resnick (MIT Media Lab) says, “Rather than trying to minimize screen time, I think parents and teachers should try to maximize creative time.” So give some encouragement for your children to be productive and make the most out of the screen time that they have.

You can check out #ScratchAtHome for many fun learning activities that can be done with Scratch’s free coding environment! Your child can partake in the many coding projects they have on their page.


3. Proper sitting and typing posture

Not inculcating a proper seating and keyboard typing posture from young can lead to negative consequences in the long run – such as back pain and finger strains. 

For good sitting posture, make sure that your child rests his/her back against the chair for maximum support, with shoulders relaxed and eyes looking straight ahead towards the screen. Their feet should also be resting flat on the floor or on a footrest. 

For proper keyboard typing posture, the elbows should be in an open angle (90 – 110 degrees) so as to relax the forearms and shoulders. Keep the wrists straight, neither flexed upwards or downwards and resist resting them on the desk as this puts pressure on the tendons and cuts off blood circulation!

With our Basic Computer Skills course (Ages 6-8), students will not only learn how to type with the correct posture and method but also learn how to type efficiently and gain computer and web navigation skills! It’s the best start for your child’s digital journey.


4. Be Productive with Digital Technology

One of the ways in ensuring that your children’s time with digital devices remains productive is through engaging in its use together. For example, you can take online courses with them – which can lead to both educational achievement and productive bonding with your child!

Coding Lab’s Mother’s Day Workshop that was conducted earlier this May saw many mother-child pairs having a whale of a time while learning how to program everlasting flowers! So why not try one with your child too? (Psst, we have our Father’s Day Workshop coming up in June – be sure to check that out!)

If you’re unable to engage with digital devices together, you can always monitor their online activities with them close by – ensure that they use a shared family computer that is placed in a common area of your house!


5. Take Frequent Eye Breaks

Parents are a child’s first teachers and role models. With an increased screen time for your children, don’t forget to enforce regular eye breaks for them throughout the day to reduce blue light exposure. 

Here at Coding Lab, we recognise the importance of eye breaks to prevent digital eye strain – that’s why we make it compulsory for our students for every hour of coding! 

Well, that’s all from us! We hope that you benefit from these tips and while things may look glum now, know that every cloud has a silver lining. Stay safe and sound with your families at home and we hope to see you real soon!

There’s no doubt that computing/programming is becoming more and more of a fundamental skill needed to thrive in this digital age. This is why there has been an increase in the number of schools offering Computing as an O-Level and A-Level subject.

Does your Secondary School child have an interest in coding? Or are you a student yourself, interested in learning more about coding in the long run? 

We have collated a list of schools below that offer IB, O-Level and A-Level Computing. 

Secondary 2 is the time where students will have to go through streaming to choose their desired subject combination in upper secondary. In most cases, schools require students to do well in their English and Mathematics in order to be able to apply for Computing. Here are the schools which offer ‘O’ level Computing:

O-Level Computing (22 schools)

Admiralty Secondary School 

Boon Lay Secondary School 

Bukit View Secondary School 

Chung Cheng High School (Yishun) 

Clementi Town Secondary School 

Commonwealth Secondary School 

Holy Innocents’ High School 

Junyuan Secondary School 

Jurong West Secondary School 

Maris Stella High School 

Pathlight School 

Peirce Secondary School 

School of Science and Technology, Singapore 

Serangoon Secondary School 

Springfield Secondary School 

St. Patrick’s Secondary School 

Xinmin Secondary School 

Zhonghua Secondary School 

Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road) 

Montfort Secondary School 

Ngee Ann Secondary School 

Temasek Secondary School

ib blog 2

Need help with O-Level Computing? We offer small group tuition for Secondary 3 and 4 Computing students. Check out our classes here.


Here are the schools which offer ‘A’ level Computing:

A-Level Computing (8 schools) 

Anglo-Chinese Junior College 

Dunman High School

Hwa Chong Institution

Jurong Pioneer Junior College

Nanyang Junior College

National Junior College

River Valley Junior College 

Yishun Innova Junior College 


On the International Baccalaureate (IB) track? The International Baccalaureate (IB) programme offers two course levels for Computer Science: the Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL). Below’s a list of the schools that offer the course:

IB Computing 

Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) – HL only 

Australian International School – SL/HL

Dulwich College – SL/HL 

Global Indian International School – SL/HL 

NPS International School – SL/HL

Overseas Family School – SL/HL

St. Joseph’s Institution International – SL only 

Stamford American International School 

Tanglin Trust School 

United World College (UWC) SEA – SL/HL 

Excel IB Computer Science with us! We offer 1-1 customised IB Java tutoring and are always ready to lend a helping hand – check out our classes here


We hope that with these lists of schools, you’ll be able to make better informed decisions regarding your selection of school. Never stop learning and keep on coding!

Happy Easter Header

Coding Lab wishes all our parents and students Happy Easter! We had a whale of a time last Thursday, where 12 students attended our Easter parent-child online coding workshop.

Each parent-child pair drew and decorated their own set of digital Easter eggs, and programmed their bunny to respond to keyboard commands.

COMPLIMENTARY EASTER DOWNLOADABLE ACTIVITY

As a gift from the Coding Lab Team this Easter, the full workshop notes are available for you to download. We hope you will enjoy creating the game with your child.

Check out our students’ work here and do upload your games once you have made yours. Happy Easter!

Happy Easter Sunday! 2020
Happy Easter Sunday! Can you catch the eggs? Try it here!

Class in session
Class in session

Programming their Game
Programming their Easter Bunny Game

Some Participants at the Easter Parent-Child Workshop
Some Participants at the Easter Parent-Child Workshop

Want to get your minds away from the books? Or simply want to discover the wonders of science?

The Coding Lab team has found some fun tech-tivities – programmes and exhibitions in February – suitable for families with children and teens at the ArtScience Museum!

Disney: Magic of Animation 

If you are an avid Disney fan like us who cannot stop singing “Into the Unknown” (from Frozen 2 in 2019) or even the classic “When You Wish Upon A Star” (from Pinocchio in 1940), this is for you. From famous characters like Mickey Mouse to old-time favourite movies like The Lion King (1994) to Moana (2016), delve into behind-the-scenes of the renowned Walt Disney Animation Studios and be amazed at the capabilities and advancements of animation.

This family-friendly techtivity will get your child excited and intrigued as it showcases brilliant motion effects, graphics and sounds from our favourite Disney movies.

disney magic of animation

Details:
26 October 2019 – 29 March 2020
ArtScience Museum
Tickets from $12

English Guided Tours:
Friday 7 & 21 Feb | 3.00pm – 4.00pm
Saturday 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29 Feb | 11.30am – 12.30pm
Sunday 2, 9, 16 & 23 Feb | 11.30am – 12.30pm

For more details, click here.


2219: Futures Imagined

To those who fancy a more contemplative atmosphere, this exhibition gets you to picture what the future holds and reflect on the kind of future that you want for Singapore. It is organised into 5 Acts – Act 1: Arrival, Act 2: Home, Act 3: Underworld, Act 4: Adaptation & Act 5: Memory – all of which showcase the types of futures and contemporary issues we may possibly face. Step into and be a part of a series of immersive installations, meditative spaces and films and envision how our everyday lives would be, 200 years from now.

artscience museum

Details:
23 November 2019 – 5 April 2020
ArtScience Museum
Tickets from $12

English Guided Tours:
Friday 14 & 28 Feb | 3.00pm – 4.00pm
Saturday 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29 Feb | 4.00pm – 5.00pm
Sunday 2, 9, 16, & 23 Feb | 4.00pm – 5.00pm

Advisory: Some mature content (more suitable for teens/adults) 

For more information on this exhibition, click here.


Who said that Valentine’s Day is only for couples? We also have a Valentine’s Day workshop for some parent-child bonding in February. Enable your child to continue learning about animation through Scratch, offered in our weekly classes! If you are a teen, aspire to be a change-maker by learning app development or Python.

If you haven’t checked out our January techtivity at Gardens by the Bay, it’s still open (until 15 March)!

Come join in the fun and enter the world of science and technology this month with your children!

The Coding Lab team has selected their favourite programme and exhibition in the month of January for families. Curiosity and wonder never stops! 

Gardens by the Bay – #FutureTogether 

In conjunction with the Singapore Bicentennial, digital art and light shows will be showcased at various locations, allowing families and children to reimagine time and space through mesmerising animation and meticulous artworks. 

future together

Details:
16 Jan 2020 – 15 March 2020
Gardens by the Bay
Indoor Artworks: $10 / Free for Singaporeans
Outdoor Artworks: 7pm to midnight

For more details, click here.

With these fun events coming your way, you and your child will never be bored of learning! If you think your child can be the next tech genius, why not sign up for our weekly classes on our website too?

Did you catch Tiny Thinkers at the National Library Board’s (NLB) kidsREAD 15th Anniversary Carnival?

Thinzar, the President of Tiny Thinkers, explaining the Junior Computational Thinking kits to the children at booth.
Thinzar, the President of Tiny Thinkers, explaining the Junior Computational Thinking kits to children at the booth.

On 9th November, Tiny Thinkers was invited to celebrate the 15th anniversary of NLB’s kidsREAD programme. Tiny Thinkers had a booth for children to kickstart their Computational Thinking journey with our Junior Computational Thinking kit. The kit, developed by Tiny Thinkers and supported by the Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA), allows children to plan a character’s story and also included hands-on activities for parents to complete with their children at home.

President Halimah Yacob with (from left) Ms Low Tze Hui, Manager of Infocomm Media Development Authority and her son, Thinzar, President of Tiny Thinkers, Candice, Co-Founder of Coding Lab,
Our Tiny Thinkers team (in orange), Coding Lab Co-Founder Candice (third from left), and Amazon Web Services volunteers (in blue) taking a photo with President Halimah Yacob and Ms Low Tze Hui (far left), Manager, Infocomm Media Development Authority, and her son, Luke.

Thank you to President Halimah Yacob, Mr S Iswaran (Minister for Communications and Information), and Ms Low Tze Hui, for stopping by our booth to find out more about Tiny Thinkers and our goals for the children of Singapore!

Luke showing President Halimah Yacob what he learned from the Tiny Thinkers Junior Computational Thinking kit. (Source: President Halimah's Facebook page)
Luke even had the opportunity to show President Halimah Yacob what he learned from the Tiny Thinkers Junior Computational Thinking kit. (Source: President Halimah Yacob’s Facebook, MCI Photo by Lee Jia Wen)

Tiny Thinkers is proud to have been able to collaborate with NLB to reach out to more parents about the importance of Computational Thinking in today’s digital economy. This is especially relevant as this year’s kidsREAD programme was focused on promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics.

A volunteer from Amazon Web Services guiding two young children through the Junior Computational Kits.
A volunteer from Amazon Web Services guiding two young children through the Junior Computational Kits.

Throughout the year, we worked closely with NLB to hold free one-hour workshops titled ‘Tiny Thinkers On The Go’ at Tampines and Jurong Regional Libraries, where our Junior Computational Thinking kits were also distributed. We hope that participants of all our Tiny Thinkers events enjoyed completing the kit activities and that this jumpstarts their interests in computational thinking!

Thank you to all the Amazon Web Services (AWS) volunteers from AWS InCommunities and Connect@Amazon for collaborating with us for this event!
Thank you to all the Amazon Web Services (AWS) volunteers for collaborating with us for this event!

We also want to thank our Amazon Web Services volunteers who helped us to guide the children and spread the word about computational thinking among the event’s participants! We couldn’t have reached out to as many people without their assistance, persistence and love.

Mr S Iswaran, Minister for Communications and Information, dropped by our booth to have a chat with Thinzar, President of Tiny Thinkers, and our Amazon Web Services volunteers.
Mr S Iswaran, Minister for Communications and Information, also dropped by our booth to have a chat with Thinzar, President of Tiny Thinkers, and our Amazon Web Services volunteers.

Tiny Thinkers will also continue to collaborate with NLB next year, where free Junior Computational Thinking Kits will be given out to 3,500 participants of the kidsREAD programme to equip them with the tools to be digitally-ready.

More children trying their hand at our Junior Computational Thinking kits!
More children trying their hand at our Junior Computational Thinking kits!

If you weren’t able to get a kit this year, fret not! We know that as parents, we all want to give our children a headstart in this digital age. Do keep a lookout on our Tiny Thinkers page (or Facebook page) for updates on what we’re doing and on our future events!

Another Amazon Web Services volunteer assisting participants in Computational Thinking.
Another Amazon Web Services volunteer assisting participants in Computational Thinking.

2020 definitely looks like an exciting year ahead for our Tiny Thinkers!

About kidsREAD
A nationwide reading programme launched in 2004, it encourages positive attitudes towards reading and aims to inculcate good reading habits among young Singaporeans of all races, and especially those from low-income families.

For more information, please click here.

About Tiny Thinkers
A non-profit campaign by Coding Lab that aims to empower and educate parents to kickstart their little one’s journey in Computational Thinking.

For more information, please click here.

Coding Lab and Tiny Thinkers were at the inaugural Smart Nation & U event on 30th November and 1st December to spread the coding word to families through fun. If you weren’t there, here’s the rundown on the things that happened!

Wai Yee, our Operations Manager, sharing with a parent what we do here at Coding Lab.
Wai Yee, our Operations Manager, sharing with a parent what we do here at Coding Lab.

The collaborative two-day event between Smart Nation and Digital Government Office and National Trades Union Congress (NTUC) was held at Downtown East to share how new technologies are transforming the ways that we work, live and play. Indeed, the future is digital and it is essential to spark interests in tech – especially in our children.

A participant using a micro:bit to play a Scratch game.
A participant using a micro:bit to play a Scratch game.

Coding Lab engaged children with our wireless micro:bits, which were connected to Scratch games on the laptop. This gave them a peek into what we do in our Young Computer Scientists (for ages 7 to 9) and Advanced Computer Scientists (for ages 10 to 12) classes.

Lakshmi, Head of Marketing at Tiny Thinkers, getting parents and their children acquainted with the workshop and tips on how they can navigate in a Smart Nation.
Lakshmi, Head of Marketing at Tiny Thinkers, getting parents and their children acquainted with the workshop and sharing tips on how they can navigate in a Smart Nation.

On the other hand, Tiny Thinkers held free Tiny Thinkers On The Go workshops that distributed free Junior Computational Thinking kits for exciting parent-child activities.

Parents working on the Junior Computational Thinking kits alongside their child, and with the help of a Smart Nation Ambassador.
Parents working on the Junior Computational Thinking kits alongside their child, and with the help of a Smart Nation Ambassador.

We would like to thank our participants for joining us at our workshops, as well as the Smart Nation Ambassadors who were on-hand and actively facilitated learning among parents and children!

Coding has no age limit – we shared information on coding with people of all ages!
Coding has no age limit – we shared information on coding with people of all ages!

Coding Lab and Tiny Thinkers are pleased to work with Smart Nation Singapore once again at the Smart Nation & U event, to move towards the goal of Singapore becoming a world-class city with a leading economy powered by digital innovation. We look forward to the next time that we get to join forces again!

About Smart Nation Singapore
It is a nationwide initiative by the Singapore Government to harness the power of technology to build a Digital Economy, Digital Government and Digital Society. It was first announced by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in 2014, who described the goal and future of this nation-building initiative as a Singapore “where we can create possibilities for ourselves beyond what we imagined possible”.

For more information, please click here.

Remember Tiny Thinkers and their creative, fun ways to integrate computational thinking into your child’s everyday lives? Well good news, they’re back stronger than ever with new and improved activities rolled out – Now extending their outreach not just to parents, but also formal early childhood institutions island-wide, with over 3,500 kits!

Early last month, the Tiny Thinkers team was invited down to the annual Early Childhood Conference (ECC) 2019 to share about the importance of computational thinking at the pre-school level. Amongst an array of activities at the ECC exhibition fair, Tiny Thinkers also conducted workshops for mums and dads to try out their exciting games with their children.

During the first half of the conference, IMDA Deputy Director Foo Hui Hui shared with early childhood educators on how preschools could step up and prepare young children to be future-ready with the award-winning Play Maker programme.

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IMDA Deputy Director Hui Hui demonstrating one of their educational games 

Coding Lab, the team behind Tiny Thinkers, then followed up with an informational sharing on the importance of computational thinking in today’s tech-led economy and how to kickstart its development within the comforts of the home in a simple, fun manner.

Coding Lab Co-founder Candice Wang also highlighted the shift in our economy towards one that is driven by Artificial Intelligence (A.I), algorithms and automation, urging educators and parents alike to start to prepare themselves from an early age.

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Coding Lab co-Founder Candice Wang stressing the importance of starting young 

She then went to share some market research findings, which illustrated that whilst more than 60% of the parents surveyed acknowledged the importance of learning coding,  an alarming 95% do not have the knowledge or expertise to impart computational thinking skills to their children.

Candice then debunked the elusiveness of computational thinking with two simple ways to guide young learners aged 4 to 7 – through every-day activities (eg. Packing your schoolbag) that require little or no cost, and through the Tiny Thinkers Take Home Activity Kit.

Armed with the expertise of our tutors and Skool4Kidz on one hand and generous support from IMDA, Our SG FundNexus, and Amazon on the other, Coding Lab and Tiny Thinkers is pleased to present new games such as Solve the Puzzle (Pattern Recognition), Build a House (Abstraction) and a full-fledged board-game (Keeping Singapore Strong) in their well-received Take Home Activity Kit.

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Educators trying out the Tiny Thinkers activities 

On the 2nd day of the ECC exhibition, the Tiny Thinkers team carried out a series of workshops for parents to try out 3 of their games (Robotibby, Solve The Puzzle, Build a House) and take home the Activity Kit for free!

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Thinzar, the Head of Tiny Thinkers sharing about the importance of Computational Thinking 

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Kids figuring out how to bring Tibby to the banana

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Putting their pattern recognition skills to the test 

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Building houses with shapes 

So exciting, don’t you think? We at the Coding Lab, Tiny Thinkers, educators, parents and children alike all had so much fun! Stay tuned for more goodies and future workshops held by Tiny Thinkers by following them here.