At just 21 years old, Zhang Guangxuan is a competitive programmer who has represented Singapore in the International Olympiad in Informatics, attained 2nd Place as a Gold Medallist in the National Olympiad in Informatics (NOI), and guided many others down the same path as Singapore’s National Coach.

Get to know one of Coding Lab’s youngest but most accomplished educators.

Guangxuan and his students in class
Guangxuan and his students in class

Hi Guangxuan, how did you get started on coding? 

My journey began in the primary school robotics lab, where I tinkered with drag-and-drop “programming”. I took on the job of lead programmer, creating combinations of basic operations to accomplish missions. The joy of discovering new functions and alternative methods of programming the robot helped us to clinch top prize in programming at the National Junior Robotics Competition. Little did I know that these experiences would form my passion for artificial intelligence.

Fast forward to high school, I kept pursuing my passion by attending programming electives. These courses expanded my arsenal of programming languages, which included Python, C++ and Java, forming the foundations of computation. Learning about Artificial Intelligence (AI) has taught me much about what I truly enjoy. I am fascinated by the endless potential of AI in problem-solving and I enjoy discovering novel ideas used in AI to model problems. I will continue discovering more about AI, for as long as my passion takes me, and I hope that I can contribute to AI in the future for the good of mankind!

“In my opinion, everyone who wants to code should at least try their hand at competitive coding.”

Guangxuan has represented Raffles Institution and Singapore in numerous prestigious Olympiads in Computing, Physics, and Mathematics.
Guangxuan has represented Raffles Institution and Singapore in numerous prestigious Olympiads in Computing, Physics, and Mathematics.

How did you start to teach coding?

In 2015, I joined my NOI teammate in teaching the December NOI training course. Initially, I was concerned by my teaching capabilities as I have never been a trainer. However, the trainer community was welcoming and I picked up teaching skills along the way. I learnt to explain concepts in an easily digestible way to newcomers, challenge assumptions and to teach from first principles. 

Tell us about how a typical coding class would look like. If I walked into your classroom during a lesson, what would I see and hear? 

Students discuss while solving problems on the interactive whiteboards located in each classroom. Students collaborate while solving problems, sometimes even helping each other debug.

In your opinion, what is the most important takeaway for kids from coding class? 

Students learn Computational Thinking while solving problems. Computational Thinking can generalise and transfer the problem-solving process to a wide variety of situations, such as confidence in dealing with complexity, persistence in working with difficult problems, the potential to deal with open-ended problems, and the ability to communicate and work with others to achieve a common goal or solution.

“Build a strong foundation, and you shall be able to conquer the Olympiad.”

Guangxuan has trained countless medalists in Olympiad in Informatics Courses
Guangxuan has trained countless medalists in Olympiad in Informatics Courses

What are you up to these days?

In my free time, I enjoy keeping up with developments in technology. After exploring various computational fields such as web development and security, I realised that I enjoyed machine learning the most as it involves both the rigour of Mathematical theory and the creativity of practical application.

Just as AI must train to improve their performance, I must train myself to get better at AI. As such AI courses were not offered in high school, I have enrolled in structured online machine learning courses from Stanford University. The courses constantly challenge my thinking and helps me to gain new perspectives about coding and how to teach it to students. Currently, I’ve been learning about Machine Vision (the ability of a computer to see) by following the Stanford CS231n course.

“I will continue discovering more about AI, for as long as my passion takes me, and I hope that I can contribute to AI in the future for the good of mankind!”

How is competitive programming different?

Competitive programming is a mind sport. A lot of people are engrossed in competitive coding for the sheer thrill of it — the adrenaline rush and the satisfaction of getting your solution accepted. In my opinion, everyone who wants to code should at least try their hand at competitive coding. It has a very large and diverse online community including school and college students and even people working in big tech companies. The skills picked up can be applied directly to technical interviews for big tech companies!

What advice do you have for children/teenagers who want to participate in the NOI?

Build a strong foundation, and you shall be able to conquer the Olympiad. The course is difficult, and you will be challenged. Long-term commitment to the competitive programming sport will lead to great rewards.

Guangxuan is our educator with a passion for AI and teaching future leaders in technology.

Our non-profit Tiny Thinkers initiative began as a bold Final-Year Project for a team of Nanyang Technological University undergraduates, which has been well received and reached out to many under their leadership. As they graduate, they pass the baton on to five other undergraduates – who, although all happen to be from the National University of Singapore, are diverse and bring their own unique set of strengths to the table. 

Let’s meet the fresh new team powering the second year of Tiny Thinkers.

Chairperson: Candice Wang

“It’s heartening to see the number of hours put in by the core team and their amazing passion and enthusiasm, which rubs off on all of our volunteers.”

Candice, with a Computational Thinking Kit, at the NLB Volunteers Training
Candice, with a Computational Thinking Kit, at the NLB Volunteers Training

As a mother of two and Director of Coding Lab, Candice understands parents and oversees the operations and community engagement sectors. She admits that it is no easy feat to be a part of Tiny Thinkers for the second year running, organising activities and packing kits. But with a new team, she says, “It’s exciting to have many interested young talents who bring their unique interests, personalities and know-how to make things happen. It’s heartening to see the number of hours put in by the core team and their amazing passion and enthusiasm, which rubs off on all of our volunteers.”

With 2020 ahead, she is excited that Tiny Thinkers will be able to impact more than 7,000 young lives across many preschools and libraries in Singapore with the Junior Computational Thinking (CT) kit, which covers all 4 pillars of CT (Abstraction, Algorithm, Decomposition and Pattern Recognition). “This kit has been heavily oversubscribed and we still have a long waitlist of preschools asking for it,” she said. “Our volunteers are working hard to pack kits so it can promptly reach preschools and libraries across Singapore. We are very proud of this kit, developed in conjunction with our partners (IMDA, Skool4kids and Nexus), which infuses Total Defense values into CT and most importantly, encourages parent-child bonding.”

President: Thinzar Htet

“While it is tiring, I enjoy interacting with children during events and workshops which reminds me of why I became a part of Tiny Thinkers in the first place.”

Thinzar manning the Tiny Thinkers booth at the National Library Board's kidsREAD 15th anniversary carnival
Thinzar manning the Tiny Thinkers booth at the National Library Board’s kidsREAD 15th anniversary carnival

The former intern at Coding Lab initially helped out with Tiny Thinkers activities and was inspired to keep the flame burning after her internship ended. Thinzar recalls her experiences during Tiny Thinkers workshops, where she shared the joy of coding with parents and witnessed children enjoying themselves. “When parents hear the aim of Tiny Thinkers, they inquire and remark that it is an interesting and great thing that we are doing. These instances make me feel proud of what I have done and want to continue, despite the difficulties.” 

The second-year Sociology student was always interested in education and working with children, “So I thought that it was fitting to be a part of something meaningful like Tiny Thinkers, which equips children with the valuable skill of Computational Thinking. While it is tiring,” she admits, “I enjoy interacting with children during events and workshops which reminds me of why I became a part of Tiny Thinkers in the first place.”

Head of Talent Acquisition: Shravya Murali

“I want to create a positive difference and to spark joy in the lives of others and myself.”

Shravya (on the right) at the Mendaki Learning Festival
Shravya (on the right) at the Mendaki Learning Festival

A firm believer that every child should have access to education – specifically, computational education – regardless of their background, Shravya is on a journey to make her life more meaningful. “I want to create a positive difference and to spark joy in the lives of others and myself,” the second-year Life Sciences student said. This led to her joining the Tiny Thinkers team. “I had chances to converse with parents at the Tiny Thinkers booth during the Smart Nation & U event, and they seemed impressed and appreciated what Tiny Thinkers was doing.” 

Just like Thinzar, this motivated Shravya to continue her work with Tiny Thinkers, knowing that it benefits others. She also spent her December holidays as an intern educator with Coding Lab, gaining more experience in teaching children while also interacting with parents. When asked about what she’s anticipating for in 2020, the avid volunteer said: “I am excited for more Tiny Thinkers events to come!”

Head of Training and Development: Jeffrey Tan

“I have been looking out for an avenue to give back through mentoring for a while now, so this came at the right time … I feel that I can make a difference in someone’s life here.”

Head of Training and Development, Jeffrey
Jeffrey giving a talk about computational thinking at the Smart Nation & U event

During one of his volunteer stints, Jeffrey was observed to have been working excellently with kids and was approached by Shravya to be a part of Tiny Thinkers. “I have been looking out for an avenue to give back through mentoring for a while now, so this came at the right time,” the third-year Computational Biology student enthused, citing the aims of Tiny Thinkers as the inspiration for joining. “They are very clear, achievable and most importantly, meaningful. I feel that I can make a difference in someone’s life here. I am able to multiply my value through training volunteers and subsequently gather feedback to improve the materials.” 

On Tiny Thinkers activities, Jeffrey mentions that it is heartwarming how parents are also involved. “It’s always nice to witness the parent-child physical connection especially in today’s increasingly digitalised society,” he remarked. “While the background of a family often plays a part in a child’s education, we strive to put everyone on the same starting line as we welcome the digital age.” 

Head of Marketing: Lakshmi Suresh

“I believe in devoting myself to a greater purpose, which involves helping others.”

Lakshmi giving a talk at the Early Childhood Development Agency (ECDA) Conference
Lakshmi giving a talk at the Early Childhood Development Agency (ECDA) Conference

The bubbly second-year Business student was a former intern educator at Coding Lab, where she also helped out with marketing activities. Lakshmi’s interest in entrepreneurship and social service was what led her to be a part of the team. “I believe in devoting myself to a greater purpose, which involves helping others,” she said. “Once I heard about Tiny Thinkers and their vision, I felt immediately drawn to helping the team out by tapping on my personal strengths.” 

In managing media channels and disseminating messages, her dedication is further spurred on by the effects of what she does. “I really love it when the publicity successfully attracts people to attend our events and to see parents and children have fun warms my heart,” she gushed. “I hope that Tiny Thinkers can be understood as an organisation that is out to make a difference, and that we can get more volunteers and participants to make our vision a reality!”

Head of Logistics: Senthamaraiselvan Pooja

“Being involved in something as meaningful as Tiny Thinkers has really made my university life more exciting as there are many exciting events going on to help spread computational thinking to young children.”

Pooja (on the right) at the ECDA Conference
Pooja (on the right) at the ECDA Conference

The second-year Biomedical Engineering student is in charge of ensuring that the materials and kits are delivered to the right place and at the right time. “I wish that I received more exposure to computational thinking at a young age,” Pooja confessed. “But by joining the Tiny Thinkers team, I find great delight in being part of a team that equips today’s children with this skill. This is especially critical now as Singapore is moving towards becoming a Smart Nation, so computational thinking would definitely be highly relevant in many future jobs.” 

When asked how she manages to juggle school and studies, Pooja mentioned that just being focused on studying can make life dull. “Being involved in something as meaningful as Tiny Thinkers has really made my university life more exciting as there are many exciting events going on to help spread computational thinking to young children,” she said.

 

The Tiny Thinkers team. Back row (from left): Jeffrey and Shravya Front row (from left): Lakshmi, Thinzar and Pooja
The Tiny Thinkers team. Back row (from left): Jeffrey and Shravya
Front row (from left): Lakshmi, Thinzar and Pooja

What’s next for Tiny Thinkers?

  • Conducting sessions for various preschools about the Tiny Thinkers Junior Computational Thinking kit
  • Working with National Library Board’s kidsREAD programme to distribute 3,500 computational thinking kits to beneficiaries
  • More workshops to empower more kids and achieve the target of 7000 kits to be given out!
The recent Tiny Thinkers training of around 100 NLB Volunteers with guests Ms Low Tze Hui from IMDA and NLB KidsRead Manager Ms Pearle Chua.
The recent Tiny Thinkers training with close to 100 NLB Volunteers. Ms Low Tze Hui from IMDA and NLB KidsRead Manager Ms Pearle Chua and her NLB team posing with the Tiny Thinkers Team.

About Tiny Thinkers:

A non-profit campaign by Coding Lab that aims to empower and educate parents to kickstart their little one’s journey in Computational Thinking. For more information, please click here.

You can also join the Tiny Thinkers team as a volunteer or work with them as a corporate volunteer by filling up this form: https://forms.gle/ezNGx38Q6EYnZgWR6. You can also keep up to date with them on Facebook or Instagram.

Something special comes around every four years… and we’re not just talking about the Olympics. It’s the ever-so-elusive 29th February in a year that has 366 days.

Coding-Lab-29feb-facts-1080

In celebration of 2020 being a leap year, here are 5 fun facts about leap years that you (probably) didn’t know about.

1. Leap Years are because of the Earth’s rotation

It takes the Earth approximately 365.24 days (or 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes and 46 seconds [1]) to complete its rotation around the sun. This is one solar year. To make up for that missing 0.24+ days, 29 February is added to the year’s calendar every four years.

Bonus: Leap years are in multiples of four, but century years (e.g. 1900, 2000) do not follow this rule [2]. They must be multiples of 400 to be a leap year, so 1900 and 2100 are not leap years. In summary, leap years are divisible by four, but centuries are an exception whereby only the years that are divisible by 400 are leap years.

Don’t worry, we’ve made it simpler for you to find out if a year is Leap or not. 😎 Check out our Leap Year Generator below! Simply input the range of the years you want to check, and voila! the years which qualify as Leap years will appear. #themagicofcode #leapyeargeneratorftw

2. Thank Julius Caesar for Leap Day

Before Julius Caesar took over the Roman Empire, it was a 355-day-a-year system, where there would be an extra 22-day month every two years [2]. He had his astronomer, Sosigenes, modify the system into having a leap day every four years.

In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII and his astronomers improved it to come up with the Gregorian calendar. It was then decided that there would be no leap year every 400 years, which is how leap day as we know it came to fruition [3].

3. Leap Days/Months/Years are different in other calendars

While the Gregorian calendar (the one that is mainly used) stipulates that 29 February is the Leap Day, this isn’t the case in other calendars.

  • The official Indian calendar arranges its months differently from the Gregorian calendar. The first half of the year have 31 days, while months in the second half of the year, so the leap day is planned close to 29 February [34].
  • The Chinese calendar has 12 months with 353 to 355 days in a year. A leap year happens every three years where a month is added and the year has 383 to 385 days instead. The leap month even has the same name as the previous month! [56]

Leap days and years happen for other planets too! Its own orbit around the sun to make up a year are not exact as well, so these ‘leaps’ happen to ‘make up for it’. On Mars, for example, a year is made up of 668.599 Martian days. Every three years, a day is subtracted – so the leap days are then divisible by 2 or 5 [78].

Bonus: The odds of being born on 29th February, a leap day, is one in 1,461 [2]. What’s the math behind this? It’s simply the probability of being born once every four years, but since the fourth year has 366 days, the sum is: 365 + 365 + 365 + 366 = 1,461

4. The Leap Year Capital of the World is Anthony

In 1988, neighbours Mary Ann Brown and Birdie Lewis and leaplings (people born on 29 February) got the idea to create a festival to celebrate Leap Day. Officials gave them the go-ahead, so the little town has been celebrating with a four-day Leap Year Festival every four years complete with music, food and fun! [910]

This year is no exception. It’s held in Anthony, on the border of Texas and New Mexico, in the United States of America [9], and has been declared by the governors as the Leap Year Capital of the World.

5. Women used to propose on this day

Back then, it was a tradition for men to propose, but on leap days, women could pop the question instead. There have been various origin stories of how this came about.

Legend goes that St Bridget complained to St Patrick that women had to wait too long for suitors to propose in the 5th Century, so he granted 29th February as the day for women to propose. [23] Another common story is that adding 29th February every four years was deemed as ‘ridiculous’ and was not recognised by the English law as a day. As it was not a ‘legal day’, traditions could be broken on this day and a British play joked that it was a day where women should act like men. This inspired women to propose to men on Leap Day – eventually evolving into Bachelor’s Day or Sadie Hawkins Day – an event still celebrated in the United Kingdom today. [211]

Another legend is that Queen Margaret of Scotland decreed that men would get fined for turning down marriage proposals by women in the leap year [2]. In Denmark, 12 pairs of gloves must be given to the woman if a Danish man refuses the marriage proposal. As for Finland, fabric for a skirt is given instead. In Greece, getting married in a leap year is considered unlucky. [29]

Of course, it’s more common for women to propose marriage now! Did you hear about the lady who proposed to her boyfriend at the football match between Manchester United and Inter Milan at Singapore’s National Stadium? You can read about it here.

Bonus: a hotel in Iceland is offering a free stay for couples if women propose on Leap Day [12].

 

Special fun fact (18+): The Leap Year cocktail  

Let’s toast to it! In 1928, pioneering bartender Harry Craddock at London’s renowned Savoy Hotel invented the Leap Day Cocktail. He published it in his 1930 The Savoy Cocktail Book. [9, 11]

Leap Year Cocktail Recipe

March. The month of school holidays and Easter break, where you can travel, explore or go on family activities… but as it all flies by so quickly, why not make the most of it? The team here at Coding Lab has put together fun tech-tivities that you and your kiddos can do together!

Magical Shores at Sentosa

Experience Singapore’s first beach light attraction, where art is produced in real-time by tracking and recording data of the wind speed and people’s movements. It’s sure to intrigue your budding tech kiddos to think of how such real-time art is produced with the power of technology, as well as for everyone to revel in the FREE multi-sensory experience of lights and sounds, with various different acts – each with its own charm and beauty.

Magical Shores at Sentosa

Details:
From 23 January 2020, Daily*
(subject to weather conditions)
7.30pm – 10.30pm
Siloso Beach, Sentosa
FREE

For more details, click here.


Home-Based E-Learning

If you’re looking to stay indoors this school holidays, why not try out our Home-Based E-Learning classes for just $10? Let your child learn the basics of programming games and animations with Scratch or pick up one of the most versatile and popular programming languages, Python, from your living room or their own bedroom. They’ll get to learn directly from one of our passionate tutors, while maximising their time by picking up a 21st century skill!

E-Learning (7-18)

Details:
From 29 February 2020 – 5 March 2020
Various dates and timings available
From your own home!
At only $10

To sign up and for more details, click here.


We’re also having a special online Easter coding workshop for two hours, at only $10! You and your child are more than welcomed to join us in programming a bunny to go on an egg hunt and to decorate the Easter eggs, in true Easter fashion. Don’t fret, our usual March Holidays and Easter break camps for the age groups of 7-9, 10-12 and 13-18 are still ongoing, if face-to-face classes are preferred!

If you haven’t checked out our February techtivities at the ArtScience Museum, it’s still open (until 29 March for Disney: Magic of Animation and 5 April for 2219: Futures Imagined)!

Meet Christian. At only 12 years old, he has already breezed through our roadmap and attended our Python Perfect classes (which we recommend to 13-year-olds and above), where he coded an impressive Pokémon game on his own.

His story has been featured on the Tiny Thinkers blog before, which covered how the special needs child was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder and gradually found his passion for programming. We talk to the young boy, who is part of Eunos Primary School’s Robotics Club and aspires to be a professional coder, as he continues his coding journey with us.

Christian's parents kick-started his interest in programming when they bought him a book titled "Adventures in Minecraft".
Christian’s parents kick-started his interest in programming when they bought him a book titled “Adventures in Minecraft”.

Hi Christian! Could you tell us about your program? 

Christian: I started it in class after I finished my Python assignment from the teacher. I would continue to work on it as a reward whenever I finished my in-class assignments early! The program is like playing the Pokémon game without the graphics, so it’s all text-based in Python.

What gave you the idea for the program?

Christian: Everyone else seemed to be coding something practical, I suppose maybe because they were older. I didn’t really know what practical stuff I could code, so I decided to do a simple Pokémon program because I was playing it quite a bit on my Nintendo Switch.

Christian-Codes-finally

What were some difficulties you faced when developing this program? 

Christian: I ran into a lot, of course. There was one when I asked to view the Pokémon in my party, and all the letters would split up. It took me a while to realise that I was missing a function. Generally, attending classes helped me to solve what I needed to know but the Coding Lab teachers also taught me what I didn’t know codes could do. They also gave me hints on what could have gone wrong with my codes, suggested more efficient ones, and even gave me ideas on how to improve my program.

Start small, start with something you like. Keep going and don’t give up!

Do you have any future plans for your program?

Christian: Currently, I am preparing for the dreaded PSLE. But I’m looking to add more features to my game, and to modify it to a more MMORPG (massively multiplayer online role-playing game) style that I enjoy playing. It’s still not completed yet, so I just want to finish it and run it. Hopefully, after I finish my program, I can get some beta testers who can give me suggestions on how to improve.

Christian, 12, spends most of his free time on the computer or reading on Kindle.
Christian, 12, spends most of his free time on the computer or reading on Kindle.

What advice would you give to young coders who are new to coding?

Christian: Start small, start with something you like. Keep going and don’t give up!

Christian, 12, is a student at Eunos Primary School taking his PSLE this year. He started off with our Scratch holiday workshop course in 2018 and has since completed our ScratchMIT App Inventor and Python classes.

He aspires to be a professional coder in the gaming industry and to work at Google someday. It is evident that Christian loves coding, and it is one of his many strengths. We’re sure that he will do great, and we look forward to seeing his future programs! 

#CodingInRealLife: 3 Cool Things You Can Use Coding For

Programs, apps, games… it seems like coding is all so digital, isn’t it?

Sometimes you just want to code something tangible – something you can see or feel, or even taste. Here are three real-world items that use code (and if you experiment with these items, you can program it too), which gives you an idea of how you can experiment and program things too.

1. DIY Light-Up Shoes

CODING LAB - DIY LED Shoes

Do your own thing with your shoes! You can have modified, custom light-up Vans or Adidas shoes with strobe lighting, lights that ‘blink’ with each step or maybe even lit up with your own words. There’s no bigger flex than saying “I did this myself” when you’re complimented on your one-of-a-kind shoes. All you need are LED strips (make sure they’re waterproof!) and curiosity… and any additional items, depending on what your end goal is.

Would you believe that coding is actually used in such projects? Why not kick it up a notch? Code it on your own, and you could be posting your very own codes online for others!

 

2. Self-Watering Plants

CODING LAB - Plant

We all know that tech can improve our lives. Why not take it a step further to simplify gardening? But be warned, you need plenty of research beforehand! What are the ideal conditions for seeds to germinate? When does the plant need more water and how will this happen? How much water is sufficient? These are just some questions you have to think about.

Alternatively, you can buy one yourself. Click and Grow makes Smart Gardens for your own indoor herb gardens. As they say, “Grow anything with zero effort”! It comes with self-timers for the lights and you only need to refill the water tank every two to three weeks, depending on the plants you grow.

 

3. Robotic Woks 

CODING LAB - Robot Wok

Is it 3020 already? It’s futuristic to imagine having robot chefs whipping up consistent meals for us… but this is already a reality – here in Singapore. At Resorts World Sentosa’s Ruyi, under Tunglok Group, fried rice is being whipped up by a robotic wok.

Can’t cook? If you’re considering to purchase a robo chef for yourself, MIK Corporation from Japan sells a diverse range of it – from making your own sushi to fried rice too. Of course, it comes with a hefty price tag… unless you can code your own wok!

 

Want to get your minds away from the books? Or simply want to discover the wonders of science?

The Coding Lab team has found some fun tech-tivities – programmes and exhibitions in February – suitable for families with children and teens at the ArtScience Museum!

Disney: Magic of Animation 

If you are an avid Disney fan like us who cannot stop singing “Into the Unknown” (from Frozen 2 in 2019) or even the classic “When You Wish Upon A Star” (from Pinocchio in 1940), this is for you. From famous characters like Mickey Mouse to old-time favourite movies like The Lion King (1994) to Moana (2016), delve into behind-the-scenes of the renowned Walt Disney Animation Studios and be amazed at the capabilities and advancements of animation.

This family-friendly techtivity will get your child excited and intrigued as it showcases brilliant motion effects, graphics and sounds from our favourite Disney movies.

disney magic of animation

Details:
26 October 2019 – 29 March 2020
ArtScience Museum
Tickets from $12

English Guided Tours:
Friday 7 & 21 Feb | 3.00pm – 4.00pm
Saturday 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29 Feb | 11.30am – 12.30pm
Sunday 2, 9, 16 & 23 Feb | 11.30am – 12.30pm

For more details, click here.


2219: Futures Imagined

To those who fancy a more contemplative atmosphere, this exhibition gets you to picture what the future holds and reflect on the kind of future that you want for Singapore. It is organised into 5 Acts – Act 1: Arrival, Act 2: Home, Act 3: Underworld, Act 4: Adaptation & Act 5: Memory – all of which showcase the types of futures and contemporary issues we may possibly face. Step into and be a part of a series of immersive installations, meditative spaces and films and envision how our everyday lives would be, 200 years from now.

artscience museum

Details:
23 November 2019 – 5 April 2020
ArtScience Museum
Tickets from $12

English Guided Tours:
Friday 14 & 28 Feb | 3.00pm – 4.00pm
Saturday 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29 Feb | 4.00pm – 5.00pm
Sunday 2, 9, 16, & 23 Feb | 4.00pm – 5.00pm

Advisory: Some mature content (more suitable for teens/adults) 

For more information on this exhibition, click here.


Who said that Valentine’s Day is only for couples? We also have a Valentine’s Day workshop for some parent-child bonding in February. Enable your child to continue learning about animation through Scratch, offered in our weekly classes! If you are a teen, aspire to be a change-maker by learning app development or Python.

If you haven’t checked out our January techtivity at Gardens by the Bay, it’s still open (until 15 March)!

Game Master. App Guru. Math Whiz. Storyteller. What kind of a coder are you?

FINAL FB_What Kind Of A Coder Are You

Let our exciting quiz, specially designed to help you uncover your talent, lead you to discover the path that you were destined for!

Discover your coder personality here… 

Take our quiz!

The annual Direct School Admissions (DSA) exercise is approaching. If your child is Primary 6 this year, why not tap on his talents and achievements to seek early admission into the secondary school of his choice?

With the recent emphasis on the importance of learning coding in schools, many secondary schools now offer DSA via coding and/or info-communications which fall under the Applied Science, Engineering and Technology category. 

a. List of schools that offer coding 

There are 32 schools currently offering a range of areas for DSA such as coding, robotics, science and technology, computational thinking and computer programming. We have collated a full list of schools below for your easy reference.

DSA-SEC EXERCISE

b. Our DSA Consultation Package 

If you need assistance in selecting the best school for your child or just want to beef up his portfolio, Coding Lab is here for you. We are an appointed vendor for IMDA and our experience of teaching in schools enables us to have a deep understanding of the DSA process.

We offer an exclusive DSA consultation package that is personalised according to your child’s needs. The package includes:

  •  1-1 consultation sessions
  • Shortlisting of target school
  • Refined achievement plan
  • Interview preparation

c. Advanced Computer Scientists Classes

To better equip your child with the necessary skills, students must have completed at least 6 research areas under our Advanced Computer Scientists classes first before applying for our DSA programme. Through the lessons, he will acquire advanced problem-solving skills in 3 categories namely Micro:bit, Python and App Development and obtain practical skills by creating his own apps and projects. This will allow your child’s portfolio to stand out among the rest. 

Coding Lab strives to help your child gain entry into his dream school. We will do our best to prepare him/her with a comprehensive portfolio and boost his/her interview skills, all which will be useful in the long run. You may fill out this form if you are interested to find out more about our DSA programme.

To apply for the DSA-Sec exercise, submit your application to the DSA online portal. Application is free of charge and will be open from early May 2020. For more details, please refer to the MOE website: www.moe.gov.sg/admissions/direct-admissions/dsa-sec

Come join in the fun and enter the world of science and technology this month with your children!

The Coding Lab team has selected their favourite programme and exhibition in the month of January for families. Curiosity and wonder never stops! 

Gardens by the Bay – #FutureTogether 

In conjunction with the Singapore Bicentennial, digital art and light shows will be showcased at various locations, allowing families and children to reimagine time and space through mesmerising animation and meticulous artworks. 

future together

Details:
16 Jan 2020 – 15 March 2020
Gardens by the Bay
Indoor Artworks: $10 / Free for Singaporeans
Outdoor Artworks: 7pm to midnight

For more details, click here.

With these fun events coming your way, you and your child will never be bored of learning! If you think your child can be the next tech genius, why not sign up for our weekly classes on our website too?