We know that taking care of the little ones while working from home can be reaaaal hectic – we’ve been there too. Hang in there, mums and dads! 💪 We’ve got your back with these quick and fun wellness activities that you can rope your kids in to do together.

I’m sure as parents we know that taking breaks has many benefits. That’s why our classes have always had breaks (and will continue to have them), whether they are physical or online classes. We want our students to rest their eyes and get that extra brain boost to be the best coder that they can be!

So, we thought we would share with you the wellness activities that the Coding Lab Team encourages our students to do during breaks. We have even included the recommended age groups so that you can choose the right one. Our suggestion? Perhaps one video a day with your children (and family) so that they can remember it in the long run!

1. Eye Workouts

We only have one pair of eyes to see the world around us. Pamper it with a little massage or simply relax it gently with these videos that we have compiled for you. Maintain optimal eye health with these easy eye exercises!

Bond with your tiny tots when you perform this simple eye massage to a catchy song together. Massage the face to relieve tension quickly and easily. 

Recommended for: Ages 4 to 6 (Accompanied by parents)

Squeeze your eyes tight and then open wide! This soothes your eyes and facial muscles while you inhale and exhale deeply. It’s easy, effective and energising.

Recommended for: Ages 4 to 9

Need a quick screen break? Soothe your optic nerves and relax your eyes in less than 2 minutes. All you need are your palms, then you are good to go!

Recommended for: Ages 7 and above

Want more ideas on other eye exercises that you can do? Check out this 2-minute video that introduces 8 simple eye exercises you can do anywhere.

Recommended for: Ages 10 and above

These exercises aim to soothe your optic nerves and relax your eyes. This way, you can strengthen your eye muscles, increase your focus, ease eye movements, and stimulate your brain’s vision centre. Feeling creative? You can even design an eye workout with your favourite eye exercises.

2. Deskercise

Did you know that ‘deskercise’ (desk exercise) is a thing? All you need is a desk and chair for these moves. This is useful even if you are in the office or classroom – just do not start busting these moves while you are eating at the dining table! If you are feeling stiff, these two-minute workouts feature exercises that can all be done without leaving your chair.

Grab a chair and get moving with arm rolls and leg in-and-outs!

Ready for more deskercise? We have twists and knee lifts!

That very chair you are sitting on has some versatile functions. Try some ‘deskercise’ as the catchy music and bright colours encourage you to move along! There’s nothing like some quick yet effective movements to get active and loosen those tense muscles after sitting for a while.

Recommended for: Ages 4 to 9

Want something to add to your daily routine? Check out this 3-minute stretching plan that you can easily fit into your day!

Stretch your lower body with this 2-minute desk stretch, so you can feel your best. 

Try out some 3-minute chair yoga stretches to relax your muscles and mind.

Feeling an ache in your neck and shoulders? Here are 3 quick stretches you can do to target those tight spots!

Stretch your neck, back and arm muscles without leaving your desk! These quick and easy tutorials of chair yoga stretches (yes, it’s an upgrade from the primary school version) relieve stiff, tight shoulders and neck at your desk. Instil good digital habits and get active during your short breaks!

Recommended for: Ages 10 and above

3. Look out of the window

It is no secret that our Parkway Parade campus boasts a great view of East Coast Park and the sea. It is where our students are naturally drawn to during their breaks, which works wonders for calming and relaxing their eyes. What are the sights and sounds around your home?

Play “I spy with my little eye” with this catchy song and challenge your child to spot things around them according to the alphabets.

Recommended for: Ages 4 to 7

Go through these simple exercises, naming the things that you see around you or outside of the window. It is a great way to spend your eye break!

Recommended for: Ages 8 and above

Look out of your window together to rest your eyes and absorb the lush greenery! Appreciate the nature around you and look far away, such as spotting planes and looking at different cloud shapes. This is great for the eyes, and it is also a therapeutic experience.

4. Take deep breaths

Breathe in… and breathe out. We have all heard these words. But how often do we practice them? Release the tension in those muscles with some deep breathing exercises!

Teach your little ones square breathing with some underwater friends. They will learn the handy technique and can visualise it when they need to relax.

Recommended for: Ages 4 to 9

Take a deep breath with one of the top mindfulness apps, Calm. They have a relaxing, 1-minute video as you go down the river. Got 3 minutes to spare instead?

Recommended for: Ages 10 and above

These videos impart deep breathing to help you relax and stay calm during times of stress, or even when feeling a little stiff. Oxygen helps to promote blood flow, flushing out the lactic acid that causes muscle soreness. You can also view this playlist of helpful short videos with picturesque views and guided breathing and meditation. Feel as good as new with some breathing exercises!

5. Replenish your energy with drinks and snacks

A boy sitting on a bean bag snacking
Our students snacking at our Parkway Parade campus.
Note: Masks were only removed when eating, and social distancing measures were in place.

We could all use a little perk-me-up at any time of the day. This is why we provide snacks to our students during breaks and encourage them to drink more water. Our Python Perfect students sometimes even bring their own tidbits to nibble on as they get in the zone and code on. 

As the saying goes, “You are what you eat.” Choose the healthier options, such as the list of brain food we have compiled here. It is also as important that you drink plenty of water and stay hydrated throughout the day. As an added benefit, getting to your snacks and drinks can also help you to rack up more steps. Research has found that this can even improve your creativity!


We hope that you had fun doing these activities together with your family, taking productive and fun wellness breaks, and making great memories working from home and together with your family!

Read: Getting Through MOE HBL

At Coding Lab, we do our best to instil these habits, which we hope will go a long way. If you see your children doing some exercises during their coding classes, don’t be shy and join in the fun. Let’s all work together to achieve better physical and mental wellbeing!

Read Next: More Tips to Better Eye Health

GIF of our Young Computer Scientists doing some deskercise - with grandpa joining in the fun!
Our Young Computer Scientists doing some deskercise – with grandpa joining in the fun!

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Home-Based Learning (HBL) is slowly becoming the new norm, with students, teachers and parents familiarising themselves with digital devices in order to continue the pursuit of knowledge.

Wondering how to enjoy HBL with your child or how you can get through it? Look no further! From concerns of screen time to helping your child acclimatise to online learning while juggling other responsibilities, we have you covered!

The Coding Lab Team has specially curated a list of tips for you and your child to navigate this HBL successfully. Take deep breaths and read them below!👇

Tip #1. Create a conducive environment for learning

Tip #1 - Create a conducive environment

Did you know?
Good learning environments can increase one’s motivation, focus and general learning ability.

Ensuring a conducive learning environment is fundamental to the quality of your kid’s learning. So, what are some ways that you can create the ideal learning environment and help your child to learn better? 

  • The state of your child’s study space can determine their learning ability and life habits, so encourage them to organise their study area. This reduces visual distractions, which improves focus and memory. It also helps that you are building good lifelong habits in them!

  • Too many members in your household at home? Discuss and decide on the house rules and map out the areas to learn, work, rest, and bond. Your child could do HBL at the tidy dining table while you work in the living room. This way, everyone has the perfect environment to work and study in!

Tip #2. Plan daily routine

Benjamin Franklin once said, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail.” Did you know that planning a daily routine with your kid also encourages them to take ownership of their learning?

Unlike in schools where there are teachers to supervise your child, you may not always be available to watch over them, nor make certain that they are doing their work. In this case, it is crucial that you establish a structured routine with them.

Guide your child to plan their own HBL days and set their own learning goals. This will help your child to get into the right mindset, be more productive and keep the boundaries between work and home from blurring.

  • Consider when to study, play and eat together, which will teach your child to be disciplined and to stay on track.
  • Ensure that mealtimes are consistent (balanced and nutritious) to provide nourishment for your growing children.
  • Make sure that your child changes out of his/her pyjamas before HBL starts! This will serve as a cue to start the school day.

Tip #2 - Plan daily routine

Need a planner template?
The Coding Lab team has created a printable planner for you. Print it out and put it on the fridge, use a whiteboard, Google or Apple calendar – try it out and find out what works best!

Tip #3. Inculcate healthy digital device habits

Tip #3 - Inculcate healthy digital device habits

Did you know?
You can control and monitor your child’s screen time with Digital Wellbeing on Android devices and Screen Time on Apple devices. Beyond simply restricting your kid’s access, educate them on how they can take responsibility for their own online well-being. 

Read more: 5 Tips to Better Eye Health

With full HBL, the age at which children use digital devices and are encouraged to get one of their own is getting younger. Healthy digital device habits are necessary for our digital economy, with the widespread use of digital devices. What are these “healthy digital device habits”? It refers to using the Internet responsibly, minimising screen time and taking regular eye breaks! 

Follow ROLE to cultivate healthy screen use habits:

  • Review your child’s and your own screen use, so you can be a role model for your little one.
  • Offer fun screen-free alternatives to engage your kid. For example, have them do off-screen activites with family-friendly games such as Jenga or a family exercise session together.
  • Limit your child’s screen time and ensure that there are consequences to violating their amount of screen time allocated. 
  • Eliminate unneeded background screen time, such as the TV, to avoid distracting your child. 

Additionally, enforce regular eye breaks. We make it compulsory for our students to take eye breaks every hour – whether they are doing physical or online classes. This instills good eye care habits, and we all know the benefits of having breaks – it gives us a breather and helps us to be productive and stay focused. Set a timer and look out of the window at something green together with your child, and reap the benefits together!

Tip #4. Have regular check-ins

At the end of the day, make time to have regular conversations with your child. Such check-ins can help them feel supported and cared for. Ask your child about their day gently, but be sure to listen attentively! Simple questions such as ‘How was your day?’, ‘What did you learn in class today?’ and ‘How is your daily routine?’ can spark a meaningful conversation.

It is essential for you to model this behaviour by sharing about your day too. How was your own day? You can take the opportunity to bond with your child and affirm him/her for the resilience and learning to adapt to the current situation, encourage your child to explore strengths and interests, and help them work through any issues that they might need help with. You can also involve other family members and check in on their well-being.

This is also a good chance for you to exemplify how the topics they have learnt in their textbooks and assignments work in real life. For instance, if your child is learning about lipids in school, you could make a cup of Dalgona coffee with them and explain the science behind how lipid compounds in coffee oil help to form a stable coffee foam that you can pour over milk. You can even get creative and make latte art together too!

Tip #4 - Have regular check-ins

Wondering what to talk about?
Here are some conversation starters and topics.

  • Do you require any guidance or assistance?
  • Is there something that you want to do or learn more about?
  • How do you feel about the current COVID-19 situation?

Tip #5. Have ‘me time’

Tip #5 - Have 'me time'!

Learn about STEM through comics!
We’re giving away 5 sets of colourful STEM comics by Piqolo Kids for ages 3 to 9. Hurry on and participate here, the giveaway ends on 31 May 2021!

‘Me time’ is a need for daily functioning, not a want. It also increases productivity! By making a conscious effort to take the time out to relax, it can release stress and tension, and increase motivation.

MOE announced that HBL would enable students to have the time and space to explore their areas of interests by initiating learning activities independently. Let your child read up on topics of interest or try out activities they are passionate about, such as tinkering, baking or playing a musical instrument (why not give coding a try?).

But, ‘me time’ shouldn’t only be reserved for your child! Yes, even if you are a responsible parent, you still need your own personal time. We know that working from home and supervising your kids can be tough and require more of your attention. All this parenting can have a mental and physical strain on you. Making time for yourself to rest and recharge is paramount in preventing severe burnout during this time. Play your favourite movie, contact your friend for a chat or take a jog — just find time for your personal relaxation! Remember, taking care of yourself is the first step to taking care of your children. 

We hope these five tips will help you in getting through HBL with your dear child (or children!), and do share this article with your friends and family if you found it useful! 

Now that you’ve read our article on what you can do to get through your child’s HBL, why not learn even more tips to make your child’s digital journey the best it can be? From proper typing posture to digital security, read What You should know Post-Circuit Breaker now to learn more and gear up for when Hybrid classes make a comeback! 😉

Need more resources? You can check out the Parent Kit curated by MOE. Remember to stay home, stay safe and stay curious! 🤩


Best-in-class Curriculum for Coding

Awards (600 x 129)

We are honoured to be the winner of multiple awards
Thank You for your support.

Hop on board the Coding Lab train! Click here to get our monthly newsletters straight to your inbox.

Ages 4-6 | Ages 7-9 | Ages 10-12 | Ages 13-18

Call us at +65 6528 2282
Email us at learntocode@codinglab.com.sg
Chat with us via WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger